156 House

Seattle, Washington

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This 1909 Greenlake home was lifted three feet to create a full height basement and repair a failing foundation wall. The new height has opened up expansive views of the Cascade Mountain Range and increased natural light in the interior while keeping the house within the scale of the neighborhood. The front porch is a modern interpretation of the traditional stepped walls that flank entry steps in many turn of the century Craftsman homes. The locally harvested cedar slats glow when lit from beneath the porch. The white planter caps are powdercoated steel to provide a durable surface that can withstand the unprotected southern exposure. The bridge from the sidewalk to the front door is designed for a future raingarden.
A madrona and pine tree were removed during construction and repurposed into a public art installation and furniture piece.

The madrona tree has been immortalized by glass artist, Martin Blank, in the Crystal Skin series of the Fluent Steps installation at the Museum of Glass reflecting pool in Tacoma. The madrona was used as a mold for the Crystal Skin series. Martin Blank’s work can be seen at http://museumofglass.org/exhibitions/outdoor-art/ and http://martinblankstudios.com/

The pine tree was repurposed as an 8’ long wood bench on castors for the homeowner.

Photos 3 & 4 taken by Chad Kirkpatrick, Witness To Beauty.